Employment & Training

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In alignment with initiatives under the Off Reserve Aboriginal Action Plan (ORAAP), the BCAAFC assists with the development and implementation of programs supporting the employment, training, and education of Indigenous people in BC.

The Aboriginal Non-Profit Strategy (anpBC)

The anpBC strategy supports employment within BC’s Aboriginal Non-Profit (ANP) sector to sustain and uplift the important work of each organization.

BC’s ANP sector is comprised of hundreds of organizations across the province who provide services to improve the lives of Indigenous people. Services cover a wide variety of topics, all integral to healthy individuals and communities: housing, employment, substance abuse treatment, health and wellness, sports and recreation, arts and culture, and child and family services.

Visit the anpBC website to find out what funding options are available for your organization.

Northern Corridor Centres

The Northern Corridor initiative is part of the BCAAFC’s strategy to increase employment and training among Indigenous people. Northern Corridor Centres have the resources and training to help clients find meaningful employment.

There are seven Northern Corridor Centres: 

  • Fort Nelson Aboriginal Friendship Centre
  • Friendship House Association of Prince Rupert
  • Kermode Friendship Society (Terrace)
  • Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre (Smithers)
  • Prince George Native Friendship Centre
  • Fort St. John Friendship Society
  • Nawican Friendship Centre (Dawson Creek)

Providing the following services:

  • Resume and cover letter building
  • Education and training certificates
  • Career planning through self-assessments
  • Interview skills
  • Computer access
  • Job boards
Words from a program coordinator (April 2019)

“Since the December holidays I have seen two clients obtain fulltime employment through the Northern Corridor initiative. Both clients expressed urgent need to work to support their children and break a recent cycle of substance-abuse. It can be challenging to find work placements under such circumstances. Having access to support from the community keeps individuals focused on their goals and hopeful for a better future. The Friendship Centre provides a space for this community support and additional resources to uplift individuals looking to make positive changes. The Friendship Centre staff understands that a holistic approach to personal development provides the greatest opportunities for success. This understanding means that we work together to meet the unique needs of each client who walks through our doors looking for employment. When I follow-up with clients after three months of transitioning into an employment routine, their housing has stabilized, their diets have usually improved, and their overall stress levels have been reduced.”

Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre Society 
Luba Kasum: employment.office@dzelkant.com | 250-847-5211 ext. 212

Fort Nelson Aboriginal Friendship Society
Lovely Behn: jpc.fnafs@northwestel.net | 250-500-1656

Fort St. John Friendship Society 
Jennifer Smith: jennifer@fsjfs.ca | 250-785-8566

Friendship House Association of Prince Rupert 
William Gye: ep-coordinator@friendshiphouse.ca | 250-627-1717 ext. 29

Kermode Friendship Society
Holly Harris: job.coach@kermode-fs.ca | 250-635-4906

Nawican Friendship Centre 
Willow Napolean: nfcnc@nawican.ca | 250-782-5202
Jannah Kohlman: nfcpd@nawican.ca

Prince George Native Friendship Centre Society 
Angela Gervais: agervais@pgnfc.com
Sheryl Elgie: selgie@pgnfc.com | 250-564-3568 ext. 230